Species

CitrinaTelmarc Gardens

 

Species

The species plants are the ones found in the wild. We detail them in the section Daylily Types. They are very hardy, bloom profusely and can frequently be used as part of an overall display. The only one we recommend not ever being used is the H fulva Europa, the common daylily, it is an invasive weed. As such it is fine for filling in barren spots. We used it to fill in hill sides and swamp areas. It takes flooding and drought, it takes foot traffic, and it seems to propagate better than crabgrass. So beware. We have spent many days this summer of 2007 digging out the old Europas from twenty years ago.

The Table below is a summary of the species we have been growing. Again beware that there is a great deal of variability within species and sometimes even less across the species. They cross hybridize an one may not have the exact species as in nature. This table has been prepared from what we have in the summer of 2007 and one should consider it a work in progress. Plodek's site has a great deal of detail and he has on that site a paper in seed pod comparison. We have found that the pods vary from location to location and from season to season on the same plant. There are certain "tell-tale" signs but try not to look for distinct differences.

It should be noted that http://www.theplantlist.org/browse/A/Xanthorrhoeaceae/Hemerocallis/

or The Plant List Web site presents the following list:

Name

Status

Confi­dence level

Our List

Source

Hemerocallis citrina Baroni

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis darrowiana S.Y.Hu

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis dumortieri E.Morren

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis esculenta Koidz.

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis × exilis Satake

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis × fallaxlittoralis Konta & S.Matsumoto

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis forrestii Diels

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L.

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis hakuunensis Nakai

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis hongdoensis M.G.Chung & S.S.Kang

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus L.

Accepted

H

Yes (flava)

WCSP

Hemerocallis littorea Makino

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis middendorffii Trautv. & C.A.Mey.

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis minor Mill.

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis multiflora Stout

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis nana W.W.Sm. & Forrest

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis plicata Stapf

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis taeanensis S.S.Kang & M.G.Chung

Accepted

H

WCSP

Hemerocallis thunbergii Barr

Accepted

H

Yes

WCSP

Hemerocallis yezoensis H.Hara

Accepted

H

Yes (citrina)

WCSP

which contains many we have. The problem with the species is that there is variability. The question is what is variability and what is a fundamental difference. I spent a few years studying systematics and decades on pattern recognition and frankly I can always be surprised. Plodek has been a standard I have used since he has extensive field experience.

For example we see H citrina variability but it is nocturnal and highly fragrant. This list adds coreana to it. H coreana as we have it, from Apps and others, is sessile diurnal and not fragrant. We do not see H aurantiaca, not a fulva, but a separate reddish species whose roots are not as bulb like. H altissima is a tall yellow with some fragrance. The List calls it a H citrina. Now I have these plants side by side and root by root, and unless my pattern recognition systems are amiss they are not the same. This list is supposed to be "the list" but the more I study it and compare it to others the more I am concerned. I have not changed any plant labels.

The following are some details. We suggest those interested look at the details in the Book on Hemerocallis.

Altissima

The altissima is a very tall daylily and mine reach well over 5'.

The picture to the left depicts the H altissima we have been growing for several years. It is most likely a variant because of the throat coloration. H altissima generally is tall, late blooming, branched, and all light yellow. In a correspondence with Dr. Plodek it seems that this is most likely Autumn Minaret, which is a Stout hybrid of H altissima X H fulva. The other H altissima which I have are pure yellow which seems to be what is agreed to be true altissima. This plant is truly the tallest we have.

Aurantiaca

  

H. auritaniaca is a very hardy and persistent flowerer. I have been using it to cross with some diploids to try to get the strong flowering characteristic.

Citrina

This is the budding and flowers. The tips of the buds are dark color, almost a dark reddish in coloration. The seed pods also have that color as well. The plant shows good branching.

Coreana

 

Dumortieri

 

Flava

 

Fulva

 

Hakunensis

 

Middendorfii

 

Minor

 

Multiflora

 

Thunbergerii